UTPA economics professor appointed to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics committee

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UTPA economics professor appointed to U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics committee

The University of Texas-Pan American professor of economics Marie T. Mora has been appointed a member of the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics Data Users Advisory Committee. Her term lasts three years through Jan. 15, 2015.

As a DUAC member, Mora is considered a prominent expert in labor economics, being an active member and past president of the American Society of Hispanic Economists and studying recent entrepreneurial trends along the Texas-Mexico region in particular. In Nov. 2011, she presented research on Hispanic entrepreneurship, titled “On the Earnings and Employment of Female Hispanic Entrepreneurs in the 2000s” at the Board of the Governors of the Federal Reserve System conference. The research was co-authored by fellow UTPA economics and finance professor Alberto Dávila, who is also Mora’s husband and frequent research collaborator.

Mora will join 18 other appointees on the DUAC committee composed of economists, business and labor analysts and public policy specialists representing various sectors of the economy including business, research, labor, government and academic communities. Members meet two times a year.

The committee is responsible for providing the Commissioner of Labor Statistics the priorities of BLS data users, suggestions concerning the addition of new programs, changes in the emphasis of existing programs and the cessation of obsolete ones. The committee is also requested to give advice on innovations in data collection, dissemination and presentation.

The BLS operates more than two dozen surveys and programs that measure employment and unemployment, compensation, worker safety, productivity and producer price movement as well as data used to estimate prices and inflation.

“Data collected by the BLS are extremely important, not just in terms of labor policy, but also for fiscal and monetary policies in general,” said Mora. “I feel it is very important to hear from people from diverse backgrounds and from communities who use these datasets, but are often overlooked at the national level.”

This month, Mora was also one of six people invited to a follow-up discussion small business and entrepreneurship at the Board of the Governors of the Federal Reserve System in Washington, D.C. It was a follow-up to the Nov. 2011 conference in which she presented her findings on female Hispanic entrepreneurs, whose skill-adjusted earnings improved from 2000-2009, despite the recession.

This article was originally featured in the Feb. 29, 2012 edition of Valley Business Report’s e-Brief. To receive the e-Brief weekly via email, subscribe here.

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