Harlingen School District Dedicates New Academy

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Harlingen School District Dedicates New Academy

Harlingen School Superintendent Art Cavazos speaks during the dedication of the district’s new Media Arts and Communications Academy. (VBR)
Harlingen School Superintendent Art Cavazos speaks during the dedication of the district’s new Media Arts and Communications Academy. (VBR)

“Creative incubator” gives hands-on experiences

Although the Harlingen school district’s the new Media Arts and Communications Academy opened with the start of the school year, officials introduced it to the community at a ceremony this week.

HCISD Superintendent Art Cavazos said the academy serves as “a creative incubator to inspire students” who are considering a future in the field.

The academy teaches classes in television, radio and graphics arts production. It is housed in a portion of the former Memorial Middle School on 13th Street. In addition to classrooms, the band hall was transformed into a television studio.

Students will cover school and community events for broadcast on the district’s television station. They will shoot, write and edit stories as well as produce video projects and short movies. The district spent approximately $300,000 on the renovation.

Students will have the opportunity to earn certifications as a television or radio operator as well as in graphics and production software.

The Media Arts and Communications Academy is one of six being introduced in the Harlingen school system. Other academies include Health Science; Firefighter; Transportation, Distribution and Logistics; Teaching; and Apprenticeship.

The academy program is designed to expose students to “high demand career tracks,” Cavazos said, allowing them to “get right into the space they most desire.”  

 

 

George Cox is a veteran journalist with more than 30 years experience as a newspaper writer and editor. A Corpus Christi native, he started his career as a reporter for The Brownsville Herald after graduating from Sam Houston State University with a degree in journalism. He later worked on newspapers in Laredo and Corpus Christi as well as northern California. George returned to the Valley in 1996 as editor of The Brownsville Herald and in 2001 moved to Harlingen as editor of the Valley Morning Star. He also held the position of editor and general manager for the Coastal Current, a weekly entertainment magazine with Valleywide distribution. George retired from full-time journalism in 2015 to work as a freelance writer and legal document editor. He continues to live in Harlingen where he and his wife Katherine co-founded Rio Grande Valley Therapy Pets, a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising public awareness of the benefits of therapy pets and assisting people and their pets to become registered therapy pet teams.

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